Turbidity and fecal indicator bacteria in recreational marine waters increase




Turbidity and fecal indicator bacteria in recreational marine waters increase following the 2018 Woolsey Fire. A study investigated oceanic responses to the 2018 Woolsey Fire using satellite remote sensing and in situ data analyses. They examined 2016–2020 turbidity plume (n = 192) and 2008–2020 fecal indicator bacteria (FIB, n = 15,015) measurements at variable proximity to the Woolsey Fire.


In the western United States, wildfire activity has increased since the late twentieth century in frequency, duration, and season length. As wildfire activity increases, soil hydrology and, by extension, water quality will increasingly become affected. More specifically, wildfire accelerates soil erosion rates by removing vegetation and litter cover, intensifying and translocating soil hydrophobicity, and inducing soil sealing.


This is a very interesting study, read more HERE at Scientific Reports